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> > > DaDaFest and Turf Love present Unsung

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Unsung, the DaDaFest and Turf Love production, had its first run at Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre 9-12 March 2016. The play, written by John Graham Davies and James Quinn, features the life story of Edward Rushton, an important but largely forgotten figure in Liverpool’s history, who campaigned for the abolition of slavery and established the Royal School for the Blind. Review by Trish Wheatley.

Left: Liam Tobin playing Captain Blake. Right: Joe Shipman playing Young Edward Rushton One man consoles another whilst he is rubbing his eyes. They are sitting upon a ship’s decking. They both wear seaman’s clothing from the eighteenth century.

Liam Tobin as Captain Blake (left) and Joe Shipman as Young Edward Rushton (right). Photograph: Harrie Muir.

Unsung, the DaDaFest and Turf Love production, had its first run at Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre 9-12 March 2016. The play, written by John Graham Davies and James Quinn, features the life story of Edward Rushton, an important but largely forgotten figure in Liverpool’s history, who campaigned for the abolition of slavery and established the Royal School for the Blind. Review by Trish Wheatley

disability arts online

Three people look across to the right. A woman stands whilst a man sits at a table in front of her, another man sits on a crate behind and above them. They all wear period clothing from the eighteenth century and a ship’s desk laden with books is in the

Rachel Austin playing Ann Rushton (left), John Wilson Goddard as old Edward Rushton (centre) and Chris Jack playing Kwamina (right). Photograph: Harrie Muir.

Unsung, the DaDaFest and Turf Love production, had its first run at Liverpool’s Everyman Theatre 9-12 March 2016. The play, written by John Graham Davies and James Quinn, features the life story of Edward Rushton, an important but largely forgotten figure in Liverpool’s history, who campaigned for the abolition of slavery and established the Royal School for the Blind. Review by Trish Wheatley

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